Scottish Straight Shorthair Cat Breed

The Scottish Breed Group comprises four cat breeds – The Scottish Fold, shorthaired and longhaired and the Scottish Straight, longhaired and shorthaired. These cats can all be born in the same litter as one another and are identical. However, the ears of the Scottish Straight cats are normal, upright ears and the Scottish Fold cats’ ears are folded forward and down. Both Scottish Fold cats and Scottish Straight cats have identical structural features and personalities.

Scottish Straights are charming and sweet. They are intelligent, curious and very devoted to their families. You will often find them following their human companion from room to room and around the house.

This cat breed features a round face, round eyes, and rounded body, making them really cute and adorable. Their body is medium-sized and medium-boned.

Scottish Straights have good appetites; however, they are not as energetic as other cat breeds. So, they tend to gain extra weight. Because of this, this cat breed must be encouraged to be active to maintain a healthy weight. Take advantage of their love for attention and interaction by keeping them busy with interactive play while keeping them healthy and fit.

These playful and curious cats are intelligent. You can keep their brain busy by teaching them games and provide them with puzzle toys to challenge their intelligence.

Scottish Straights love the company of their families, other cats, and cat-friendly dogs than being left alone for long periods. This cat breed gets along great with both children and other pets. 

Scottish Straight Shorthair Cat Breed | The Pedigree Paws

Breed Information

Size:
Medium
Height:
20-25 cm
Weight:
4-6 kg
Life Span:
12-14 years
Temperament:
Sweet, Curious, Affectionate, Fun-Loving, Laidback, Sociable
Coat:
Short
Colours:
Variety
Energy Level:
Low-Medium
Registration:
TICA, CFA, FIFe
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Scottish Straight Shorthair Cat Breed | The Pedigree Paws
  • Grooming: Once a Week 2/10
  • Shedding: Low 2/10
  • Hypoallergenic: Low 2/10
  • Activity Level: Medium 6/10
  • Playfulness: Medium 6/10
  • Friendliness to other pets: High 10/10
  • Friendliness to children: High 10/10
  • Affection towards it’s owners: High 10/10
  • Vocality: Low 2/10
  • Intelligence: Medium 6/10
  • Independence: Medium 6/10

History

This cat breed was found unintentionally in 1961 by a Scottish farmer named William Ross. He saw a white cat named Suzie on his neighbour’s farm near Coupar Angus, Tayside Region of Scotland, with unique folded ears. Suzie’s ancestry was not identified; however, her mother was identified as a straight, white-haired cat. William Ross was so charmed with the cat that he bought a kitten from Suzie’s subsequent litter. This kitten had its mother’s physical characters. He then started a breeding program with his cat, Snooks, and began attending various cat shows.

William Ross named the cat breed “lop-eared” after a variety of rabbit. He registered the new cat breed with the GCCF or the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy in 1966, where the breed was later renamed to Scottish Fold. Sadly, in the early 1970s, the GCCF stopped recognizing the cat breed due to concerns over ear disorders like mites, infections, and hearing problems.

In the same year, the Scottish Fold cat came to the United States. The three of Snook’s kittens were transported to Dr. Neil Todd at the Carnivore Genetics Research Center in Massachusetts, researching spontaneous mutations. And while his research with the Scottish Fold cats did not gather favourable outcomes, Dr. Todd did find good homes for these cats. One female cat named Hester was given to Salle Wolfe Peters, a renowned Manx breeder in Pennsylvania. Later, Salle was credited with establishing the cat breed in the United States.

The straight ear kittens born in the same litter have lately become their own cat breed known as the Scottish Straight. Every Scottish Fold and Scottish Straight alive and thriving today can trace their ancestry back to the original cat, Susie. Today, The International Cat Association Scottish Fold and Scottish Straight breeders are permitted to use the British Shorthairs and the American Shorthairs in their breeding programs.

The Scottish Straight cat is one of the cat breeds that belong to the Scottish Breed Group, along with the beloved Scottish Fold. 

Scottish Straight Shorthair Cat Breed | The Pedigree Paws

Appearance

Scottish Straight Shorthair Cat Breed | The Pedigree Paws

Scottish Straight cats are a medium-sized cat with medium boning. They are characterized as generally "round" – rounded body, round face, and round whisker pads. The tips of their ears are rounded too. Scottish Straight cat's ears are straight and continue that way to adulthood, than bending downward and forward like their Scottish Fold cat siblings. Their eyes are round and widely spaced, combined with their domed head, and their straight ears give them an amazingly appealing and open look that a lot of cat fanciers have endeared with over the years. Scottish Straights have short legs and a very compact body, adding to their distinctive appearance that has been compared to an owl or a teddy bear. They maintain their "kittenish" expression even in adulthood.

This cat breed comes in a wide array of patterns and colours, including all of those in the Pointed and Traditional Divisions. These colours include bicolour, particolour, tabby and white, tabby, and solid. Also, every eye colour is possible; however, copper is the most common. 

Personality

The Scottish Straight cats, like the Scottish Fold cats, is best known for their curiosity, intelligence, and loyalty. These cats are not naturally shy, as they would choose always being around their human companion, perhaps even following them from one room to the next.

Despite loving being around their family, these fantastic cats generally do not like being carried or picked up. They do have a little bit of an independent side that makes them comfortable and contented being near their human companion but still being able to do their own thing.

Therefore, Scottish Straight cats make excellent pets for those searching for a cat that will be dedicated without being too dependent and clingy to their human family.

Despite loving being around their families, these adorable cats usually do not like being carried or picked up. Scottish Straights are known to have a bit of an independent side which makes them comfortable and relaxed being near their human companion but still being able to do what they want to do. And because of this, they make excellent pets for those who are looking for a feline companion that will be loyal without being too needy or clingy to their family.

Because these cats are so bright, you can even train them to play fetch or do tricks. In addition to their playfulness, this cat breed is also known for being quiet and easygoing. These beautiful cats will even get along well with other pets and with children. 

Scottish Straight Shorthair Cat Breed | The Pedigree Paws

Trainability

Scottish Straight Shorthair Cat Breed | The Pedigree Paws

When a Scottish Straight cat is properly socialized and trained during their kittenhood, they will thrive on being a well-rounded and well-mannered feline companion. These laidback and friendly felines are intelligent and curious cats, and they adore human interaction, which is why they are easy to train and learn tricks and games.

You can challenge their intelligence by keeping them busy by teaching them tricks and games and provide them plenty of puzzle and interactive toys which they can play alternately. As they gain extra weight because of their appetite, it is best to encourage them to get active to maintain a fit and healthy body, away from weight-related health conditions and illnesses. 

Coat & Care

Shorthaired Scottish Straights could benefit from a simple weekly brushing or combing to avoid hairballs and lessen shedding. Bathing them once a month will help them eliminate loose hair and keep and maintain their coat clean and healthy.

Brushing their teeth daily is best; however, weekly brushing is enough to keep them away from tooth and gum diseases. Keep their nails clean by trimming them twice a month or when needed. For their eyes, you can wipe the corners of their eyes with a clean, soft, damp cloth to remove any discharge. Just make sure to use a different part of the damp cloth for each eye to prevent any eye infection risk.

To keep their ears in great condition, check it weekly for dirt, debris and wax. Wipe them out with a clean cotton ball or soft damp cloth moistened with a vet-approved ear cleanser. If you notice any foul odour, immediately contact your vet for treatment.

Their litter boxes must be clean at all times, not only because they are particular about bathroom hygiene but because it will help keep their coat clean as they do their business in the litter box. If it is left dirty, it may cause matting and tangle on their coat, and they tend to use other places in the house. 

Scottish Straight Shorthair Cat Breed | The Pedigree Paws

Health

Scottish Straight Shorthair Cat Breed | The Pedigree Paws

Scottish Straights are generally a healthy breed, just like their Scottish Fold sibling. Their life expectancy is between eleven to fourteen years with proper care, exercise, and a high-quality diet. However, there are still health problems that may affect the Scottish Straighs, which include the following:

  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy – is a form of heart disease.
  • Degenerative joint disease – it causes pain or pain mobility on their tail, ankle or knee joints. 

Children & Other Pets

Scottish Straights are happy to live with other cats and cat-friendly dogs. But as always, it is best to introduce pets gradually and in controlled environments to ensure that they learn to get along well together.

The laidback and affectionate Scottish Straight loves playing. That’s why they are an excellent choice for families with children. They learn tricks easily and loves the attention they get from children who treat them with respect and politeness. However, always supervise younger kids to avoid accidents and won’t hurt the cat by pulling their fur or twisting their tail. Remember, Scottish Straights are not fond of being picked up. 

Scottish Straight Shorthair Cat Breed | The Pedigree Paws
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